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Friday, October 26

  1. page Conceptual Art & Duchamp's Influence edited ... {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_NnZ5LqRi8DY/TUHkoPtHObI/AAAAAAAAA9M/FoX6r3ompN0/s400/1212.png} Da…
    ...
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_NnZ5LqRi8DY/TUHkoPtHObI/AAAAAAAAA9M/FoX6r3ompN0/s400/1212.png}
    Daniel Buren (artist of the above piece, Intervetion 1) used a lot of abstract and lines in his piece.
    BIBLIOGRAHPY
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=duchamp&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CD4QFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.understandingduchamp.com%2F&ei=kneKUOjxLMmC2wXt8YGwCg&usg=AFQjCNHAD0_SYI9DFy_MDie3JCMgqcdScQ
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=duchamp&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CEQQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.duchamplondon.com%2F&ei=kneKUOjxLMmC2wXt8YGwCg&usg=AFQjCNEYZiWcpy6Pj6d_D8DEKDRkSrb7jA
    (view changes)
  2. page Conceptual Art & Duchamp's Influence edited ... {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_NnZ5LqRi8DY/TUHkoPtHObI/AAAAAAAAA9M/FoX6r3ompN0/s400/1212.png} Da…
    ...
    {http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_NnZ5LqRi8DY/TUHkoPtHObI/AAAAAAAAA9M/FoX6r3ompN0/s400/1212.png}
    Daniel Buren (artist of the above piece, Intervetion 1) used a lot of abstract and lines in his piece.
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=duchamp&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CD4QFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.understandingduchamp.com%2F&ei=kneKUOjxLMmC2wXt8YGwCg&usg=AFQjCNHAD0_SYI9DFy_MDie3JCMgqcdScQ
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=duchamp&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CEQQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.duchamplondon.com%2F&ei=kneKUOjxLMmC2wXt8YGwCg&usg=AFQjCNEYZiWcpy6Pj6d_D8DEKDRkSrb7jA
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=duchamp&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CEsQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marcelduchamp.net%2F&ei=kneKUOjxLMmC2wXt8YGwCg&usg=AFQjCNFoGj0nCtK2KnsIHrB0Dem2XqmRAw

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Monday, October 22

  1. page Conceptual Art & Duchamp's Influence edited ... Brandon Edwards, Reeva Bourdic and Emily Hanson, 5th Hour The idea of conceptual art is that …
    ...
    Brandon Edwards, Reeva Bourdic and Emily Hanson, 5th Hour
    The idea of conceptual art is that it focuses on ideas and meanings, and not so much on forms and materials. A quote that I found in an article talks about conceptual art. “Because the fact remains that Conceptual artists successfully redefine the concept of art to the extent that their efforts are widely accepted as art by collectors, gallerists, and museum curators” ( Wolf 1) This quote states that Conceptual artists like to have their works be accepted by the audience and the people who display their art. Duchamp had a very big influence on Conceptual artists because of the ready-mades that some people claim are “art”. The most famous readymade that Duchamp made was the fountain. The reason that conceptual artists liked that piece of “art” was because the fountain was unique and creative, it gave artists like Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol’s a lot of motivation for his type of art.
    Duchamp is considered the god father of conceptual art because he was one of the first main people to bring it to life. People were scared to bring out something new in this time period but Duchamps decided otherwise. In order to get the art he created some of the artwork from Vince Van Gough helped him and influenced him. Some others that were also part of the conceptual art movement were Billy Apple, Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Vanessa Beercroft, and Joseph Beuys. Those were just a few of the ones who helped the art movement happened.
    Conceptual art says that art is concepts and ideas take higher concern over the traditional types of art and material concerns. Some forms are temporary, like a cage of live birds. Conceptual art comes from the DaDa movements; it attacks the sacredness and permanence of the artwork itself. The idea is, essentially, more important than the actual piece.
    “When an artist uses a conceptual form of art, it means that all of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair. The idea becomes a machine that makes the art.”
    —Sol LeWitt
    {http://www.darkheartfelt.com/storage/beuyshappen.jpg?__}
    ...
    is a sculpturepicture by Joseph
    {http://contemplativeprocess.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/bicycle-wheel.gif?w=640}
    This is one of Duchamps pieces
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Thursday, October 18

  1. page Duchamp's Influence on Modern Art edited ... Artists Duchamp Influenced Tracy Emin {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F3r4tYxkrYY/Tgbj0kxByZI/AAA…
    ...
    Artists Duchamp Influenced
    Tracy Emin
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F3r4tYxkrYY/Tgbj0kxByZI/AAAAAAAAB1g/tQedtDjKa5I/s1600/a-tracy-emin.jpg} My BedMy Bed
    The article "Duchamp's urinal tops art survey" states that this piece was inspired by Duchamp. Like Fountain, My Bed is also considered a "ready-made". It's actually made up of a bunch of ready-mades. Also like Fountain it doesn't seem like it's meant to be an "attractive" work of art. The bed is unmade, the sheets are stained, there is underwear and trash next to it. It's meant to make you think, and doesn't have an obvious meaning. Duchamp felt that art actually also involved the viewer interpreting what the piece meant. My bed forced the viewer to do just that.
    Richard Hamilton
    {http://www.tate.org.uk/art/images/work/T/T02/T02011_10.jpg}
    Richard Hamilton was known as the father of "pop-art" and reconstructed Duchamp's The Large Glass using notes from Duchamp's The Green Box. He interpreted many of Duchamps pieces and was a friend of Duchamp. When talking about meeting Duchamp he said:
    "Oh, he was the most charming person imaginable: kind and clever and witty. Eventually I became one of the family."
    ...
    {http://theartblog.org/blog/wp-content/uploaded/exhmd61-1.jpg} Screen Test
    Jasper Johns
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d7/Three_Flags.jpg/250px-Three_Flags.jpg} ThreeThree Flags (1958)
    While Jasper Johns didn't design the American Flag he takes it and shows it to the viewer in a different way, like how Duchamp did with Fountain. Below is a sketch of the profile of Duchamp's face. It was shown at an exhibit celebrating Dumchamp's influence on modern art.
    {http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/duchamp/images/07_thumb.jpg} M.D. M.D.
    Quotes About Duchamp's Influence
    ...
    aesthetic beauty."
    -Marcel Duchamp talking about Dadaism
    “Marcel Duchamp, one of this century’s pioneer artists, moved his work through the retinal boundaries which had been established which had been established with Impressionism into a field where language, thought and vision act upon another.… The art community feels Duchamp’s presence and his absence. He has changed the condition of being here.”
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  2. page Duchamp's Influence on Modern Art edited By Kiley Baringer, Lexi Sterlini, and Emma Jones Marcel Duchamp completely changed art when he sen…
    By Kiley Baringer, Lexi Sterlini, and Emma Jones
    Marcel Duchamp completely changed art when he sent in a urinal to be displayed at an art exhibit. He called the piece "Fountain" and submitted it under the name Richard Mutt. Fountain caused controversy and made people ask "what is art?" Duchamp believed that art could be anything. He states that Fountain is art simply because "He CHOSE it. He took an article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view - created a new thought for that object." This idea that art was anything and everything has influenced modern art and artists since then.
    Movements Duchamp Influenced
    Dada- Duchamp was apart of an unofficial art movement called Dada, that changed contemporary art. Some people actually called it 'anti-art' movement. Since Duchamp had a major impact on contemporary art with his ready-mades many dadaist were influenced by him.

    Artists Duchamp Influenced
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F3r4tYxkrYY/Tgbj0kxByZI/AAAAAAAAB1g/tQedtDjKa5I/s1600/a-tracy-emin.jpg} Tracey Emin-Tracy Emin
    {http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-F3r4tYxkrYY/Tgbj0kxByZI/AAAAAAAAB1g/tQedtDjKa5I/s1600/a-tracy-emin.jpg}
    My BedMy Bed
    The article "Duchamp's urinal tops art survey" states that this piece was inspired by Duchamp. Like Fountain, My Bed is also considered a "ready-made". It's actually made up of a bunch of ready-mades. Also like Fountain it doesn't seem like it's meant to be an "attractive" work of art. The bed is unmade, the sheets are stained, there is underwear and trash next to it. It's meant to make you think, and doesn't have an obvious meaning. Duchamp felt that art actually also involved the viewer interpreting what the piece meant. My bed forced the viewer to do just that.
    {http://media.sacbee.com/smedia/2012/02/21/16/33/vtYp6.St.4.jpg}
    Andy Warhol- Brillo Box (1969) and Cambell's Soup (1966)
    Andy Warhol was another inspired by Duchamp. Both his Brillo Boxes and Cambell's Soup paintings were considered ready mades. The Brillo boxes were just like the ones sold in stores and Warhol didn't design Cambell's Soup Cans, so overall they were objects chosen by the artist to be art. Warhol also made a "Screen Test" film of Duchamp because he inspired him.
    Screen Test
    {http://theartblog.org/blog/wp-content/uploaded/exhmd61-1.jpg}
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d7/Three_Flags.jpg/250px-Three_Flags.jpg} Jasper Johns- Three Flags (1958)
    While Jasper Johns didn't design the American Flag he takes it and shows it to the viewer in a different way, like how Duchamp did with Fountain.
    {http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/duchamp/images/07_thumb.jpg} Jasper Johns- M.D.
    A sketch of the Profile of Duchamps face that was shown at an exhibit about Duchamp.

    Richard Hamilton
    Richard{http://www.tate.org.uk/art/images/work/T/T02/T02011_10.jpg}
    Richard
    Hamilton was
    ...
    "pop-art" and created the cover of "The White Album" for the Beatles.reconstructed Duchamp's The Large Glass using notes from Duchamp's The Green Box. He interpreted
    ...
    of Duchamp.
    Movements Duchamp Influenced
    Dada-
    When talking about meeting Duchamp he said:
    "Oh, he
    was apartthe most charming person imaginable: kind and clever and witty. Eventually I became one of an unofficial art movement called Dada, that changed contemporarythe family."
    Andy Warhol
    {http://media.sacbee.com/smedia/2012/02/21/16/33/vtYp6.St.4.jpg} Brillo Box (1969) and Cambell's Soup (1966)
    Andy Warhol was another inspired by Duchamp. Both his Brillo Boxes and Cambell's Soup paintings were considered ready mades. The Brillo boxes were just like the ones sold in stores and Warhol didn't design Cambell's Soup Cans, so overall they were objects chosen by the artist to be
    art. Some people actually calledWarhol also made a "Screen Test" film of Duchamp because he inspired him.
    {http://theartblog.org/blog/wp-content/uploaded/exhmd61-1.jpg} Screen Test
    Jasper Johns
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d7/Three_Flags.jpg/250px-Three_Flags.jpg} Three Flags (1958)
    While Jasper Johns didn't design the American Flag he takes
    it 'anti-art' movement. Sinceand shows it to the viewer in a different way, like how Duchamp haddid with Fountain. Below is a major impactsketch of the profile of Duchamp's face. It was shown at an exhibit celebrating Dumchamp's influence on contemporary artmodern art.
    {http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/duchamp/images/07_thumb.jpg} M.D.
    Quotes About Duchamp's Influence
    "I threw the bottle-rack and the urinal into their faces as a challenge and now they admire them for their aesthetic beauty."
    -Marcel Duchamp talking about Dadaism
    “Marcel Duchamp, one of this century’s pioneer artists, moved his work through the retinal boundaries which had been established which had been established
    with Impressionism into a field where language, thought and vision act upon another.… The art community feels Duchamp’s presence and his ready-mades many dadaist wereabsence. He has changed the condition of being here.”
    -Jasper Johns
    “Many artists have spent significant energies exploring his legacy”
    -Mike Bidlo
    “I was greatly
    influenced by him.Duchamp, if only indirectly, by questioning what painting is – and should be.”
    -Vija Celmins

    Sources
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/feb/09/art
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2010/feb/14/richard-hamilton-interview-serpentine-cooke
    http://www.examiner.com/article/new-smithsonian-exhibit-shows-marcel-duchamp-s-influence-on-warhol-jasper-johns
    http://epc.buffalo.edu/authors/perloff/dada.html
    http://www.warholstars.org/warhol1/12dada.html
    http://www.toutfait.com/issues/volume2/issue_5/articles/girst2/girst1.html

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  3. page Contemporaries - Other Art Forms edited Kendall Owens, Malak Beydoun The idea of contemporaries in other art forms is referring to the…

    Kendall Owens, Malak Beydoun
    The idea of contemporaries in other art forms is referring to the people of Duchamp’s time who had similar views on art as he did. Duchamp’s style was very unique and caused a lot of controversy from time to time. His art wasn’t always accepted by the public and other artists because it wasn’t what people always “wanted to see”. People argued that his work wasn’t appropriate for public view or that it wasn’t art. Duchamp had a different view on what he saw as art and a different approach when he created his pieces. His idea was “to choose an object that wouldn’t attract me, either by its ugliness. To find a point of in difference in my looking at it…” His work was sort of rebellious against what art was thought to be and many contemporaries in other art forms had the same views/ideas on their art form as Marcel Duchamp did on his.
    Before (and during) the nineteenth century ideas on what art forms should be had already been developed. These ideas were very “strict” and opinionated. Artists stuck to these ideas and rarely ventured out to try something new. It wasn’t until the twentieth century when artists started to be curious as to what else could be done with their art form. Artists in various fields such as dance, poetry, photography, and music ventured out to be different and find something besides the normal expectations of what art should be.
    ...
    Storyville was shut down during the time of World War I and this sent many jazz musicians up the Mississippi river in search of employment and they spread their genre of jazz as they passed through the cities, including Chicago and New York. This deacade was focused on mainly jaz music and it was quickly spread.
    The American 1920s had many names: the Roaring Twenties, the Jazz Age, the Dry Decade, and the Flapper generation. Whatever the moniker, these years saw the birth of modern America. Many types of music were expressed in this decade but mostly the up beat music that even kids in the street would dance to. It was music for everybody, a very fun era. Bessie Smith was the greatest and most influential classic blues singer of the 1920s. During her heyday, she earned upwards of $2000 per week, a queenly sum in the 20s. During the 1930s, more genres of music started to emerge. The {http://themusicelitists.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/bessie_smith_8120660.jpg} electric guitar and was one of the first guitarists anywhere to to play the instrument in public. Also gospel and country started to become more versitille and spread in certain areas like Nashville. Another way music started to spread widely across the U.S. was through jukeboxes. By 1939, two hundred and twenty-five thousand jukeboxes were in operation and were said to be responsible for the sale of thirteen million records a year. The idea of awarding performers a gold record for a big selling performance dates back to1942. During a live radio broadcast, surprised band leader Glenn Miller was given the first gold record for his million selling hit, "Chattanooga Choo Choo." The award wasn't revived until 1958, for Perry Como's single "Catch a Falling Star." The first award for an album was the cast recording of the musical "Oklahoma."
    Photography
    Photography undergoes extraordinary changes in the early part of the twentieth century because of social and cultural changes; industrialization, political revolution, trench warfare, airplanes, talking motion pictures, radios, automobiles and more. Photographers wanted to create new and radical art in an effort to modernize photography. The develpement of the Kodak #1 camera helped photographers accomplish this sense of spontaneity and accuracy, corresponding to modern culture.
    {http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/assets/images/images/bresson.jpg}
    Cartier-Bresson’s leaping figure in Behind the Gare St. Lazare reflects the potential for photography to capture individual moments in time—to freeze them, hold them, and recreate them. Because of his approach, Cartier-Bresson is often considered a pioneer of photojournalism. This sense of spontaneity, of accuracy, and of the ephemeral corresponded to the racing tempo of modern culture (think of factories, cars, trains, and the rapid pace of people in growing urban centers).
    {http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kyiqpm8qyt1qztk1wo1_400.jpg}
    Umbo’s photomontage The Roving Reporter shows how modern technologies transform our perception of the world—and our ability to communicate within it.
    bibliography:
    http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/1032/Histories-Theories-Criticism.html
    http://billyjane.tumblr.com/post/416041702/umbo-der-rasende-reporter-the-roving-reporter

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  4. page Contemporaries - Other Art Forms edited ... {http://songbook1.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/original-dixieland-jazz-band-sepia-smooth.jpg} …
    ...
    {http://songbook1.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/original-dixieland-jazz-band-sepia-smooth.jpg}
    Storyville was shut down during the time of World War I and this sent many jazz musicians up the Mississippi river in search of employment and they spread their genre of jazz as they passed through the cities, including Chicago and New York. This deacade was focused on mainly jaz music and it was quickly spread.
    ...
    a year. The idea of awarding performers a gold record for a big selling performance dates back to1942. During a live radio broadcast, surprised band leader Glenn Miller was given the first gold record for his million selling hit, "Chattanooga Choo Choo." The award wasn't revived until 1958, for Perry Como's single "Catch a Falling Star." The first award for an album was the cast recording of the musical "Oklahoma."
    (view changes)
  5. page Contemporaries - Other Art Forms edited ... {http://songbook1.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/original-dixieland-jazz-band-sepia-smooth.jpg} …
    ...
    {http://songbook1.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/original-dixieland-jazz-band-sepia-smooth.jpg}
    Storyville was shut down during the time of World War I and this sent many jazz musicians up the Mississippi river in search of employment and they spread their genre of jazz as they passed through the cities, including Chicago and New York. This deacade was focused on mainly jaz music and it was quickly spread.
    ...
    the 20s.
    {http://themusicelitists.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/bessie_smith_8120660.jpg}
    During the 1930s, more genres of music started to emerge. The {http://themusicelitists.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/bessie_smith_8120660.jpg} electric guitar and was one of the first guitarists anywhere to to play the instrument in public. Also gospel and country started to become more versitille and spread in certain areas like Nashville. Another way music started to spread widely across the U.S. was through jukeboxes. By 1939, two hundred and twenty-five thousand jukeboxes were in operation and were said to be responsible for the sale of thirteen million records a year.
    (view changes)
  6. page Contemporaries - Other Art Forms edited Kendall Owens, Malak Beydoun, Jenna Nuemann The idea of contemporaries in other art forms is r…

    Kendall Owens, Malak Beydoun, Jenna Nuemann
    The idea of contemporaries in other art forms is referring to the people of Duchamp’s time who had similar views on art as he did. Duchamp’s style was very unique and caused a lot of controversy from time to time. His art wasn’t always accepted by the public and other artists because it wasn’t what people always “wanted to see”. People argued that his work wasn’t appropriate for public view or that it wasn’t art. Duchamp had a different view on what he saw as art and a different approach when he created his pieces. His idea was “to choose an object that wouldn’t attract me, either by its ugliness. To find a point of in difference in my looking at it…” His work was sort of rebellious against what art was thought to be and many contemporaries in other art forms had the same views/ideas on their art form as Marcel Duchamp did on his.
    Before (and during) the nineteenth century ideas on what art forms should be had already been developed. These ideas were very “strict” and opinionated. Artists stuck to these ideas and rarely ventured out to try something new. It wasn’t until the twentieth century when artists started to be curious as to what else could be done with their art form. Artists in various fields such as dance, poetry, photography, and music ventured out to be different and find something besides the normal expectations of what art should be.
    ...
    {http://www.toylet.it/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/spoon-river-anthology.jpg} Edgar Lee Masters: Spoon River Anthology {http://robertfrostfarm.org/i/RobertFrost-Jacobi.jpg} Robert Frost
    In this poem he used his poetic captions in order to capture the hidden passions, deceits, and hopes of Midwesterners buried in the fictional Spoon River cemetery. His poem brought death to life. Masters made poems more real for the reader. Another great poet, Edwin Arlington Robinson, had the same views/ideas and Edgar. Edwin Robinson used dramatic monologues (poems written entirely in the voice of each of his characters). Many of the monologues obtain the rhythm of everyday speech and reflect a Puritan sense of humankind’s moral corruption. Arlington brought something meaningful and deep to poetry rather than it just being words. Robert Frost further developed Robinson’s voice in poems. Frost’s poetry gave voice to modern mental constructions of identity without ever losing its focus on the local and the specific. He often wrote in the standard meter of blank verse, lines with five stresses, but ran sentences over several lines so that the poetic meter plays slightly under the rhythms of natural speech. These three poets contributed to the changes in poetry. They shared similar views with each other that poetry shouldn’t just be to entertain or inform- it should be something meaningful and real. Duchamp and the three poets have mutual relative ideas about how to expand their art form.
    Photography
    Photography undergoes extraordinary changes in
    Music
    {http://songbook1.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/original-dixieland-jazz-band-sepia-smooth.jpg}
    Storyville was shut down during
    the early parttime of World War I and this sent many jazz musicians up the twentieth century becauseMississippi river in search of socialemployment and cultural changes; industrialization, political revolution, trench warfare, airplanes, talking motion pictures, radios, automobilesthey spread their genre of jazz as they passed through the cities, including Chicago and more. Photographers wanted to create newNew York. This deacade was focused on mainly jaz music and radical art in an effort to modernize photography. The develpement ofit was quickly spread.
    The American 1920s had many names:
    the Kodak #1 camera helped photographers accomplish this senseRoaring Twenties, the Jazz Age, the Dry Decade, and the Flapper generation. Whatever the moniker, these years saw the birth of spontaneity and accuracy, corresponding to modern culture.
    influencial photographers
    America. Many types of music were expressed in this decade but mostly the time
    {http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/assets/images/images/bresson.jpg}
    Cartier-Bresson’s leaping figure
    up beat music that even kids in Behind the Gare St. Lazare reflects the potentialstreet would dance to. It was music for photography to capture individual moments in time—to freeze them, hold them, and recreate them. Because of his approach, Cartier-Bresson is often consideredeverybody, a pioneer of photojournalism. This sense of spontaneity, of accuracy,very fun era. Bessie Smith was the greatest and most influential classic blues singer of the ephemeral corresponded to the racing tempo1920s. During her heyday, she earned upwards of modern culture for example factories, cars, trains, and people growing$2000 per week, a queenly sum in urban centers.
    {http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kyiqpm8qyt1qztk1wo1_400.jpg}
    R: Umbo (Otto Umbehr), The Roving Reporter, photomontage, 1926
    Umbo’s photomontage The Roving Reporter shows how modern technologies transform our perception of
    the world—and our ability to communicate within it.
    Bibliography:
    http://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~rcollins/242photojournalism/historyofphotography.html
    http://www.ehow.com/info_8483587_1920s-photography-cameras.html
    http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/1032/Histories-Theories-Criticism.html
    20s.
    {http://themusicelitists.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/bessie_smith_8120660.jpg}

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